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Wednesday
Aug082012

Album Review: Dads, 'American Radass (this is important)'

New Brunswick is known for having a thriving music scene. Bands such as the Gaslight Anthem, Thursday and the Bouncing Souls have managed to make their mark outside of the Healthcare City. If the stars align, Dads will be the next band to join them. The two piece emo punk act have been gaining a ton of momentum since their inception a couple of years back and will head out on a two month North American tour this fall.

Aided by producer Ryan Stack (My Heart To Joy, The World Is A Beautiful Place...), American Radass (This Is Important) finds the band merging punk, emo and indie rock to create a tantalizing work of art. It's as if the band managed to combine the punk rock goodness of No Age with the heartfelt lyrics of The Front Bottoms to create a true gem. The song titles will probably make you chuckle (especially the ones with references to Cartel and The Gaslight Anthem) but that's part of the band's charm. The twinkly "Grunt Work (The '69 Sound)" wouldn't sound out of place at a hipster bar. "Get to the Beach" will easily become a fan favorite with its flourishing guitars and gut wrenching lyrics ("You used to watch me while I'd drive/but now all you watch is how many exits until you're home"). The highlight of the album is the seven minute track "Shit Twins". The emotion emitting from this number is enough to make a grown man weep. American Radass (This Is Important) will easily establish Dads as one of the finest punk acts to come out of New Jersey in recent years.

Go Download : "Shit Twins", "Get To The Beach"

 

Tracklist

01. If Your Song Title Has the Word Beach In It, I’m Not Listening To It
02. Get To the Beach
03. Honestly, Chroma Q&A
04. Aww, C’mon Guys
05. Shit Twins
06. Grunt Work (The ’69 Sound)
07. Groin Twerk
08. Big Bag of Sandwiches
09. Bakefast at Piffanys
10. Heavy to the Touch (think about tonight, forget about tomorrow)